ContactMenu
The Law Office of Jeffrey Jones
Speak With Attorney Jeffrey Jones
Local : 901-410-5751
800-863-2561
Over 35 Years Of Legal Experience Serving The Community

property division Archives

Asset division isn't always clear cut in a divorce

There are many things that you have to think about when you are going through a divorce. Each decision you make has the potential to affect your life in profound ways. The property division process is one that you must think carefully about. We can help you evaluate the options that you have for dealing with this process.

Marital agreements have an important role in marriage

When you get married, you assume that you are going to be married forever. When this doesn't happen, you might think about what you are going to do about all of the items you have accumulated during your marriage. If you had a premarital or postmarital agreement, you can fall back on those terms to handle the property division.

Learn about the options you have for complex property division

There are many different things that have to be settled before a divorce can be finalized. One of these is the property division aspect of the divorce. You and your ex will have to divvy up all of the property that was obtained throughout the course of your marriage. If you have a considerable net worth, this could be a complex process.

Think carefully about property division possibilities

Having to part with the possessions you worked hard to get can be difficult, but doing so is a reality in divorces. You have to make sure that you have a clear head when it comes time to divide property because letting your emotional attachment to the items rule can make the process much more difficult for you.

Your credit might suffer after you get a divorce

Getting divorced can impact every aspect of your life. There is one area that it can impact that you might not be able to fully control -- your credit score. This is because when you get a divorce, you and your ex have to divide the property that you have amassed. Property includes assets and debts, and this is where things get a bit tricky.

Why prenuptial agreements are important in remarriage

According to a 2013 study, in 40 percent of new marriages, at least one of the spouses has been previously married. Financial analysts say that for these couples, prenuptial agreements are particularly important. While many people are concerned that bringing up the subject of a prenuptial agreement can create issues of distrust, it's better than fighting later about what belongs to whom.

Emotional ties can't determine property division

Dividing your property after a divorce is something that can be emotional. This is especially true when items like the marital home and other sentimental assets are having to be divided. The emotional tie to these assets isn't something that can dictate what happens in a property division case. Instead, you have to look at items from a practical and legal standpoint.

Keeping the marital home isn't always ideal

One of the biggest assets that many couples own is their home. When the couples opt to divorce, the question about who gets to keep the house is one that is central to the property division process. It is important that you think carefully about what it means to keep the marital home. Once you think about these important points, you might find that keeping the house isn't all it's cracked up to be.

A level head is necessary during the property division process

In our previous blog post, we discussed some of the factors that can affect property division in a divorce. Those factors aren't the only ones that can affect your divorce. Other factors, such as your preferences, your ex's preferences and your willingness to compromise during the property division process can also have an impact on what assets and debts you have when you start your new life.

Make Your Legal Issue a Priority. Get a Case Evaluation Now.

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy